Grits and tits


There are a lot more birds at the feeders here than there were at the old place; probably not as many people have feeders out in this countryside. Or maybe the birds like to watch trains go by while dining. I haven’t seen so many chickadees and tits in one place.

Carolyn has gone for her mammogram, or, as she calls it,  “to get my titties squeezed”. Must be very uncomfortable to have done; I’m glad men don’t have to get testicle-ograms.

We have a new alarm clock; a peckerwood has been waking us for the past week at around 7:30am by drumming on the side of the house. If I was a homeowner, I would be perturbed by the potential damage that could be done by the love seeking critter, but as a renter, I find it amusing.

U.S. unemployment rate is dropping; many desperate white folk are happy to get the minimum wage sweatshop jobs which they used to think were for Blacks and Mexicans. My country ’tis of thee …

Have a helluva wicked weekend!

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Published in: on February 3, 2012 at 11:27 am  Comments (8)  
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  1. Ah the joys of a renter. Make a call and have something fixed, spill on the carpet and not think twice about it, watch plants or grass die in the yard and it is of no matter . Let the woodpecker have his fun! Cheap entertainment right? the freaking racoon (I think) has been pulling my birdfeed off the trellis and dragging it around the yard leaving bits and pieces of my very expensive “Squirrel Buster” feeder in the lawn. I’m priming the bee-bee gun nightly. the rats are getting fatter by the month as nightly when I go out to bury the compost I see a rat or two on the feeder. They don’t even run away now and must think I am the Goddess of sunflower seeds. I’ve got a honey-do list which includes a better way to hang my birdfeeders! So glad you’ve got tits and chicks. those little birds along with my Carolina wrens are my favorite visitors. Sometimes we get a large woodpecker, blue jay or finches – but not too often. Very funky music choice for this day. weekend plans? Mike and I wil be toiling in the garden beds, turning them over, excavating the ever-present pesky roots from the neighboring oaks and pines and hauling compost and dirt to refresh. I’m gonna try tomatos this year but will probably be swearing by April at the frigging cabbage worms (remind me next year not to do this again will you?). Poor Carolyn and her squooze bubbies. I don’t mind it so much as mine are fairly smallish. New word: Testicle-ogram? I’ll see if I can get Mike to let me do that 😉 Did you get your family visit yet? Yeah. I wonder if when/if I lose this job what I’ll be doing. I think I’d consider picking oranges or strawberries just a step above WalMart and I’m convinced the people would be nicer to work with. kisses to you.

    • Squirrel-resistant feeder system:
      I went to Lowe’s and bought a long length of very small, stranded cable. I attached one end about 15′ up on a tree and I brought the other end over to another tree where I had an eye-bolt screwed in at the same height. On the eye-bolt I attached a small pulley for the cable to run through without chaffing it. At about head high on the same tree, I had another eye-bolt screwed in and about waist high I had a hook screwed into the tree. I threaded the cable through the high pulley and attached an “S” hook to the end of the cable. I used this setup to lower and raise the line between the trees up and down. I clamped a length of able to the middle of the other cable and let it hang down and I attached a screen door spring to it and fixed the feeder to the spring. Use the hooks on the cable when you raise the feeder up and down to fill it; use the bottom hook when it is up and the top hook when it is down for filling with seed. This worked for me for years until I let a tree limb grow too close to the feeder. If a squirrel or rat or ‘coon jumped from the top wire to the feeder, the spring would pop up and down and sling them off. This way is cheap and easy to do, except for tree climbing; I used a long ladder (Mark, don’t try this! 🙂 ).
      Jeremy and Courtney were in last weekend.
      Yep, Wal-Mart would be at the bottom of any list of employers for me, too.

  2. Hot music of your video, dear friend, and a terrible cold in Europe; 20 degrees below zero at last night (the Celsius scale). We are all a bit scared. Though we feed them birds are really poor.
    Carolyn is right. It is rather painful test.
    So glad of Friday. In case of me it was rather hard week.
    xoxoxo

    • I saw these guys in concert back in the 70’s; they are very good.
      I know how much the animals (and some unlucky people) suffer in that kind of cold. Stay inside and keep warm. So far, we have had a very mild winter here.
      Thanks, Jola. 🙂

  3. I’ll copy and print your birdfeeder method and tack it up on the fridge under the Honey-Do list. That is one heck of a system and I know my husband will appreciate the mechanics of it. I don’t know how the little birds don’t freeze solid in the winter months.

    • It is a simple system and the only one I’ve found to keep the critters off the feeder; only one squirrel ever made and no matter how much he tried again and again, he never did get back on. Should be entertaining for your Jersey neighbors. 🙂
      Thanks, Tammy

  4. Well I have one bird feeder on a standard feeder bowl and after some trimming it just far enough away so when the squirrel jumps on it it swings away and the little grey monster falls to the ground. The other feeder is the standard long tube with several different posts for the birds.
    This one is glass and the posts are metal. Squirrels can eat from it , when it is full, but they have to hang from the top and only get small little amounts.

    Testicle-ogram sounds like torture.

    My alarm clock is a train or Summer licking my face or hand or barking if I sleep 5 minutes extra.

    Vac, laundry, clean bathroom, and have grits and a Wet Willie singer for breakfast.

    • It is fun watching a squirrel figure out how to get on a protected feeder; sooner or later …
      No trains here run on any kind of schedule that I can tell.
      The Wet Willie singer could move ’em.
      Thanks, Mark


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